Immunology

New insights into why the immune system fails to see cancer

Cancer hides in plain sight of the immune system. The body's natural tumor surveillance programs should be able to detect and attack rogue cancer cells when they arise, and yet when cancer thrives, it does so because these ...

Diabetes

Mapping the 100 trillion cells that make up your body

There are about 100 trillion cells that make up the human body. A new megascience endeavor will catalog and image each of the 200 or more types of cells from the 80 known organs and identify the genes that are active in these ...

Immunology

Cells too stiff to scavenge leads to lupus, an autoimmune disease

More than 50 billion cells die in the human body every day, a spectacle of programmed cell death called apoptosis. These cells undergo internal degradation and then fracture into apoptotic bodies that are scavenged by immune ...

Oncology & Cancer

Panel: Boys should get HPV vaccine given to girls

(AP) -- A vaccine against cervical cancer hasn't been all that popular for girls. It may be even a harder sell for boys now that it's been recommended for them too.

Immunology

Autoimmune disease—retraining white blood cells

Symptoms of an autoimmune disease disappeared after a team of scientists retrained the white blood cells. This method is extremely promising for treating diseases such as type I diabetes and multiple sclerosis.

Genetics

Malaria risk reduced by genetic predisposition for cell suicide

A human genetic variant associated with an almost 30 percent reduced risk of developing severe malaria has been identified. Scientists from the Bernhard Nocht Institute for Tropical Medicine (BNITM), Hamburg, and Kumasi ...

Medical research

Study identifies novel role of mitochondria in immune function

Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have discovered a new role for an enzyme involved in cell death. Their study shows how the enzyme, called RIPK3, relays signals between the cell's mitochondria "powerhouses" ...

Oncology & Cancer

Anti-inflammatory drug may fight breast cancer

The anti-inflammatory drug celecoxib may be a useful additional treatment for people with breast cancer, Dutch researchers report at the IMPAKT Breast Cancer Conference in Brussels.

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