Health

Many immunosuppressed persons join in hurricane cleanup

(HealthDay)—About half of immunosuppressed persons reported participating in cleanup activities following Hurricane Harvey, and less than half of those who performed heavy cleanup reported wearing a respirator, according ...

Surgery

Five-year outcomes for Brigham face transplant recipients

Brigham surgical teams have performed face transplants for people who have suffered from severe facial injuries. The surgery holds the promise of improving physical and mental health for patients who have been severely disfigured ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Older patients with Crohn's disease benefit from new medications

Combining medications that suppress the immune system has been successful in treating young patients with Crohn's disease, but some physicians have been reluctant to use this strategy in older patients because of concerns ...

page 1 from 18

Immunosuppression

Immunosuppression involves an act that reduces the activation or efficacy of the immune system. Some portions of the immune system itself have immuno-suppressive effects on other parts of the immune system, and immunosuppression may occur as an adverse reaction to treatment of other conditions.

Deliberately induced immunosuppression is generally done to prevent the body from rejecting an organ transplant, treating graft-versus-host disease after a bone marrow transplant, or for the treatment of auto-immune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis or Crohn's disease. This is typically done using drugs, but may involve surgery (splenectomy), plasmapharesis, or radiation.

A person who is undergoing immunosuppression, or whose immune system is weak for other reasons (for example, chemotherapy, HIV, and Lupus) is said to be immunocompromised.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA