Surgery

The COVID-19 pandemic's effect on solid organ transplantation

Solid organ transplants—heart, lung, liver, and kidney—are resource-intensive operations that require patients to take immunosuppressive drugs after the procedure to keep the body from rejecting the new organ.

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

New test may predict COVID immunity

Most people in the United States have some degree of immune protection against COVID-19, either from vaccination, infection, or a combination of the two. But, just how much protection does any individual person have?

Arthritis & Rheumatism

Patients with lupus benefit from COVID-19 vaccine booster

People with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) who received a "booster" dose of SARS-CoV-2 vaccine after full vaccination are roughly half as likely to have a subsequent "breakthrough" COVID-19 infection, a new study shows.

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Immunosuppression

Immunosuppression involves an act that reduces the activation or efficacy of the immune system. Some portions of the immune system itself have immuno-suppressive effects on other parts of the immune system, and immunosuppression may occur as an adverse reaction to treatment of other conditions.

Deliberately induced immunosuppression is generally done to prevent the body from rejecting an organ transplant, treating graft-versus-host disease after a bone marrow transplant, or for the treatment of auto-immune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis or Crohn's disease. This is typically done using drugs, but may involve surgery (splenectomy), plasmapharesis, or radiation.

A person who is undergoing immunosuppression, or whose immune system is weak for other reasons (for example, chemotherapy, HIV, and Lupus) is said to be immunocompromised.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA