Diabetes

First immune-evading cells created to treat type 1 diabetes

Salk Institute scientists have made a major advance in the pursuit of a safe and effective treatment for type 1 diabetes, an illness that impacts an estimated 1.6 million Americans with a cost of $14.4 billion annually.

Immunology

ANCA-associated vasculitis: The ADVOCATE study

ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV) is a systemic disease involving the formation of special autoantibodies (so-called anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies/ANCA) and vascular inflammation. There are several diseases associated ...

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Immunosuppression

Immunosuppression involves an act that reduces the activation or efficacy of the immune system. Some portions of the immune system itself have immuno-suppressive effects on other parts of the immune system, and immunosuppression may occur as an adverse reaction to treatment of other conditions.

Deliberately induced immunosuppression is generally done to prevent the body from rejecting an organ transplant, treating graft-versus-host disease after a bone marrow transplant, or for the treatment of auto-immune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis or Crohn's disease. This is typically done using drugs, but may involve surgery (splenectomy), plasmapharesis, or radiation.

A person who is undergoing immunosuppression, or whose immune system is weak for other reasons (for example, chemotherapy, HIV, and Lupus) is said to be immunocompromised.

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