Diabetes

First immune-evading cells created to treat type 1 diabetes

Salk Institute scientists have made a major advance in the pursuit of a safe and effective treatment for type 1 diabetes, an illness that impacts an estimated 1.6 million Americans with a cost of $14.4 billion annually.

Diabetes

Post-transplant diabetes may be reversible

Post-transplantation diabetes mellitus (PTDM), a common complication of immunosuppressive drugs that are given to prevent transplant rejection, may be reversible and at least partially preventable, researchers at Vanderbilt ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Promoting mixed chimerism promising in kidney transplants

(HealthDay)—For patients undergoing living kidney transplants, persistent mixed chimerism can be achieved to allow complete or partial withdrawal of immunosuppressive drugs, according to a study published in the Jan. 29 ...

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Immunosuppressive drug

Immunosuppressive drugs or immunosuppressive agents are drugs that inhibit or prevent activity of the immune system. They are used in immunosuppressive therapy to:

These drugs are not without side-effects and risks. Because the majority of them act non-selectively, the immune system is less able to resist infections and the spread of malignant cells. There are also other side-effects, such as hypertension, dyslipidemia, hyperglycemia, peptic ulcers, liver, and kidney injury. The immunosuppressive drugs also interact with other medicines and affect their metabolism and action. Actual or suspected immunosuppressive agents can be evaluated in terms of their effects on lymphocyte subpopulations in tissues using immunohistochemistry.

Immunosuppressive drugs can be classified into five groups:

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