Health

Study compares different strategies for treating insomnia

New research indicates that for treating insomnia, stimulus control therapy (which reassociates the bed with sleepiness instead of arousal) and sleep restriction therapy are effective, and it is best to use them individually ...

Obstetrics & gynaecology

Cognitive behavioral therapy effective for prenatal insomnia

(HealthDay)—Cognitive behavioral therapy is an effective nonpharmacologic treatment for insomnia during pregnancy, according to a study published online April 5 in Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

New method makes the experience of sleeplessness more visible

Some people with chronic insomnia think that they do not sleep during certain periods, whereas sleep measurements show that they do. Up till now, scientists have not been able to pinpoint the exact causes of so-called 'sleep ...

Genetics

Brain cells involved in insomnia identified

An international team of researchers has identified, for the first time, the cell types, areas and biological processes in the brain that mediate the genetic risk of insomnia. This was made possible by assessing DNA and sleep ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Insomnia has many faces

Researchers at the Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience revealed that there are five types of insomnia. This finding was published on Monday January 7 by The Lancet Psychiatry. A commentary in the journal stated that the ...

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Insomnia

Insomnia is a symptom of any of several sleep disorders, characterized by persistent difficulty falling asleep or staying asleep despite the opportunity. Insomnia is a symptom, not a stand-alone diagnosis or a disease. By definition, insomnia is "difficulty initiating or maintaining sleep, or both" and it may be due to inadequate quality or quantity of sleep. It is typically followed by functional impairment while awake. Both organic and non-organic insomnia without other cause constitute a sleep disorder, primary insomnia.

According to the United States Department of Health and Human Services in the year 2007, approximately 64 million Americans regularly suffer from insomnia each year. Insomnia is 1.4 times more common in women than in men.

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