Diabetes

Tiny change has big effects, reverses prediabetes in mice

A small chemical change—shifting the position of two hydrogen atoms—makes the difference between mice that are healthy and mice with insulin resistance and fatty liver, major risk factors for diabetes and heart disease. ...

Diabetes

Improved diabetes in spite of obesity

Eating too much fat and sugar causes weight gain and reduced health. But why is that, and is there a remedy? In a study published in the journal Cell, Prof. Jens Brüning's research group at the Max Planck Institute for Metabolism ...

Medical research

Researchers restore beta-cell function by deleting old cells

Research from Joslin Diabetes Center has shown in mice that insulin resistance increases the proportion of aged beta-cells which are dysfunction. Such an increase in aged beta-cells could lead to type 2 diabetes. These researchers ...

Immunology

VAT fat may cause pathogenic obesity

Type-2 (adult-onset) diabetes and other diseases related to the obesity epidemic depend on how the body stores excess energy, according to evolutionary biologist Mary Jane West-Eberhard, emeritus scientist at the Smithsonian ...

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Insulin resistance

Insulin resistance (IR) is the condition in which normal amounts of insulin are inadequate to produce a normal insulin response from fat, muscle and liver cells. Insulin resistance in fat cells reduces the effects of insulin and results in elevated hydrolysis of stored triglycerides in the absence of measures which either increase insulin sensitivity or which provide additional insulin. Increased mobilization of stored lipids in these cells elevates free fatty acids in the blood plasma. Insulin resistance in muscle cells reduces glucose uptake (and so local storage of glucose as glycogen), whereas insulin resistance in liver cells results in impaired glycogen synthesis and a failure to suppress glucose production. Elevated blood fatty acid levels (associated with insulin resistance and diabetes mellitus Type 2), reduced muscle glucose uptake, and increased liver glucose production all contribute to elevated blood glucose levels. High plasma levels of insulin and glucose due to insulin resistance are believed to be the origin of metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes, including its complications.

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