Psychology & Psychiatry

COVID-19 is making psychiatric treatment tougher

(HealthDay)—In the best of times, it can be hard to get mental health treatment. But these definitely aren't the best of times, and even for people who have established relationships with mental health professionals, the ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

What the coronavirus pandemic means for U.S. health insurance

The United States has confirmed more cases of the novel coronavirus than any other country in the world, with infections topping 370,000. The rapid increase in patients is straining hospitals across the nation—and poses ...

Medical economics

Unemployed workers less likely to be uninsured post-ACA

(HealthDay)—Following implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), unemployed workers were less likely to be uninsured, and uninsurance rates decreased more in states with Medicaid expansion, according to a report from ...

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Insurance

Insurance, in law and economics, is a form of risk management primarily used to hedge against the risk of a contingent loss. Insurance is defined as the equitable transfer of the risk of a loss, from one entity to another, in exchange for a premium, and can be thought of as a guaranteed small loss to prevent a large, possibly devastating loss. An insurer is a company selling the insurance; an insured or policyholder is the person or entity buying the insurance. The insurance rate is a factor used to determine the amount to be charged for a certain amount of insurance coverage, called the premium. Risk management, the practice of appraising and controlling risk, has evolved as a discrete field of study and practice.

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