Oncology & Cancer

Many perceive lack of choice in receipt of RAI for thyroid cancer

(HealthDay)—Many patients diagnosed with differentiated thyroid cancer perceive that they have no choice about receiving radioactive iodine (RAI), according to a study published online July 8 in the Journal of Clinical ...

Oncology & Cancer

Are doctors treating more thyroid cancer patients than necessary?

Nearly a million Americans live with thyroid cancer and doctors will diagnose more than 50,000 new cases this year. Fortunately, the survival rate for this kind of cancer is one of the best. Five years after diagnosis, more ...

Medications

Breakthrough alpha-ray treatment of cancer without external radiation

For many years, radioactive iodine which emits beta rays has been used for treatment of thyroid cancer. Generally, 5-year survival rates may exceed 90%. However, some thyroid tumors become resistant to iodine treatment ("iodine-refractory"), ...

Health

Vegan diets are adding to malnutrition in wealthy countries

Hidden hunger affects over two billion people, globally. The cause is a chronic lack of essential micronutrients in the diet, such as vitamins and minerals. The effects of these nutritional deficiencies may not be seen immediately, ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

First European map on iodine deficiency

Iodine deficiency (ID) is the world's leading cause of preventable brain damage. The EU-funded project EUthyroid has set up the first joint European database that can provide information on iodine status and thyroid disease ...

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Iodine

Iodine (pronounced /ˈaɪ.ədaɪn/, /ˈaɪ.ədɨn/, or in chemistry /ˈaɪ.ədiːn/; from Greek: ιώδης iodes "violet"), is a chemical element that has the symbol I and atomic number 53. Naturally-occurring iodine is a single isotope with 74 neutrons.

Chemically, iodine is the second least reactive of the halogens, and the second most electropositive halogen; trailing behind astatine in both of these categories. However, the element does not occur in the free state in nature. As with all other halogens (members of Group XVII in the periodic table), when freed from its compounds iodine forms diatomic molecules (I2).

Iodine and its compounds are primarily used in medicine, photography, and dyes. Although it is rare in the solar system and Earth's crust, the iodides are very soluble in water, and the element is concentrated in seawater. This mechanism helps to explain how the element came to be required in trace amounts by all animals and some plants, being the heaviest element commonly used by living organisms (only tungsten, used in enzymes by a few bacteria, is heavier).

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