Radiology & Imaging

Best practices for iodinated contrast media shortage

According to ARRS' American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR), to ensure that patients with emergent or life-threatening imaging indications can continue receiving care, radiology practice leaders need to quickly assess their ...

Health

Switching to a more plant-based diet affects nutrient intake

A diet based on plant sources benefits both population health and the environment. However, in plant-based diets the intake of certain vitamins and minerals can differ from that of an average Finnish diet, which is heavily ...

Health

The impacts of local iodine variations on human health

Ground water is the main source of iodine to the Somali population, but the geographical variation is considerable. While earlier studies from the region have concluded the iodine intake to be excessive or that there is general ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Gargling with iodine won't stop you getting COVID

Social media is awash with bogus COVID treatments. First, there was hydroxychloroquine, then bleach, followed hard on the heels by ivermectin—a cattle dewormer. The latest on the scene is povidone-iodine, an antiseptic.

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Iodine

Iodine (pronounced /ˈaɪ.ədaɪn/, /ˈaɪ.ədɨn/, or in chemistry /ˈaɪ.ədiːn/; from Greek: ιώδης iodes "violet"), is a chemical element that has the symbol I and atomic number 53. Naturally-occurring iodine is a single isotope with 74 neutrons.

Chemically, iodine is the second least reactive of the halogens, and the second most electropositive halogen; trailing behind astatine in both of these categories. However, the element does not occur in the free state in nature. As with all other halogens (members of Group XVII in the periodic table), when freed from its compounds iodine forms diatomic molecules (I2).

Iodine and its compounds are primarily used in medicine, photography, and dyes. Although it is rare in the solar system and Earth's crust, the iodides are very soluble in water, and the element is concentrated in seawater. This mechanism helps to explain how the element came to be required in trace amounts by all animals and some plants, being the heaviest element commonly used by living organisms (only tungsten, used in enzymes by a few bacteria, is heavier).

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA