Oncology & Cancer

Study shows lactate may prompt cancer formation

A byproduct of glucose called lactate, used by every cell in the body, may also prompt a mutated cell to become cancerous, according to new research from the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus.

Health

No, there's no evidence cookies can help with lactation

If you're a new mum, it's likely you've come across lactation cookies. Perhaps women in your mothers group are talking about them, or they've popped up in your Instagram feed, or you've seen them on the shelves while out ...

Medical research

Cancer control: Structure of important transport protein solved

For the first time, Bernese researchers have been able to solve the structure of a transport protein and thus to describe the functional mechanism that plays a significant role in the survival of cancer cells. This is an ...

Obstetrics & gynaecology

Alternations in gut microbiota in pregnancy and lactation

Recent studies have shown that maternal gut microbiota in humans primes the offspring's immune and metabolic development during pregnancy and lactation. Due to environmental factors that are impractical to control in human ...

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Lactation

Lactation describes the secretion of milk from the mammary glands and the period of time that a mother lactates to feed her young. The process occurs in all female mammals, however it predates mammals. In humans the process of feeding milk is called breastfeeding or nursing. In most species milk comes out of the mother's nipples; however, the platypus (a non-placental mammal) releases milk through ducts in its abdomen. In only one species of mammal, the Dayak fruit bat, is milk production a normal male function. In some other mammals, the male may produce milk as the result of a hormone imbalance. This phenomenon may also be observed in newborn infants as well (for instance witch's milk).

Galactopoiesis is the maintenance of milk production. This stage requires prolactin (PRL) and oxytocin.

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