Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Scientists use holographic imaging to detect viruses and antibodies

A team of New York University scientists has developed a method using holographic imaging to detect both viruses and antibodies. The breakthrough has the potential to aid in medical diagnoses and, specifically, those related ...

Health

Healthier skin with technology and expertise

As the field of cosmetic dermatology continues to evolve at a fast pace, UConn Health is expanding its offerings of both specialized technology and the expertise to optimize it for patients' benefit.

Medical research

Light stimulation makes bones heavier

Osteoporosis is a disease in which bone loses mass as a result of age or other influences. This weakening is the leading cause of fractures in the elderly, often after trivial injuries, and makes treating these "pathological ...

Medical research

New treatment for chronic wounds using CO2 lasers

Chronic wound repair can be a major problem in wound treatment. Recently, several studies have suggested that carbon dioxide (CO2) laser can be used to improve the healing of chronic wounds. This study investigates the efficacy ...

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Laser

A laser is a device that emits light (electromagnetic radiation) through a process called stimulated emission. The term laser is an acronym for light amplification by stimulated emission of radiation. Laser light is usually spatially coherent, which means that the light either is emitted in a narrow, low-divergence beam, or can be converted into one with the help of optical components such as lenses. Typically, lasers are thought of as emitting light with a narrow wavelength spectrum ("monochromatic" light). This is not true of all lasers, however: some emit light with a broad spectrum, while others emit light at multiple distinct wavelengths simultaneously. The coherence of typical laser emission is distinctive. Most other light sources emit incoherent light, which has a phase that varies randomly with time and position.

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