Neuroscience

Brain or muscles: Which do we lose first?

Someone dies as a result of physical inactivity somewhere in the world every 10 seconds—3.2 million people a year, according to the World Health Organisation (WHO). From the age of 50, there is a gradual decline not just ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Mayo Clinic Minute: What is chronic kidney disease?

Chronic kidney disease is the gradual loss of kidney function. Some people, including African Americans, Native Americans and Asian Americans, are at higher risk of developing chronic kidney disease. March is National Kidney ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Resources to maintain healthy lifestyle amidst COVID-19 outbreak

With the evolving impact of coronavirus (COVID-19) in communities across the country, many Americans are facing new challenges keeping them from getting to the office, school, grocery store or gym. The American Heart Association, ...

Diabetes

Prevention of type 2 diabetes saves billions in spending

Prevention of type 2 diabetes is a good example of specific action that improves wellbeing and helps to curtail public spending. A project focusing on the prevention of type 2 diabetes is being planned, with a research team ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Healthy living gives skin a golden glow

A healthy lifestyle significantly improves a person's skin color, according to new research led by the University of St Andrews.

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Q&A: Effective treatment available for stress incontinence

DEAR MAYO CLINIC: I was always led to believe that leaking urine while sneezing or exercising is part of life for women after menopause, but my health care provider tells me that isn't necessarily true. I've tried Kegel exercises, ...

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Lifestyle

Lifestyle was originally coined by Austrian psychologist Alfred Adler in 1929. The current broader sense of the word dates from 1961.

In sociology, a lifestyle is the way a person lives. A lifestyle is a characteristic bundle of behaviors that makes sense to both others and oneself in a given time and place, including social relations, consumption, entertainment, and dress. The behaviors and practices within lifestyles are a mixture of habits, conventional ways of doing things, and reasoned actions. A lifestyle typically also reflects an individual's attitudes, values or worldview. Therefore, a lifestyle is a means of forging a sense of self and to create cultural symbols that resonate with personal identity. Not all aspects of a lifestyle are entirely voluntaristic. Surrounding social and technical systems can constrain the lifestyle choices available to the individual and the symbols she/he is able to project to others and the self.

The lines between personal identity and the everyday doings that signal a particular lifestyle become blurred in modern society. For example, "green lifestyle" means holding beliefs and engaging in activities that consume fewer resources and produce less harmful waste (i.e. a smaller carbon footprint), and deriving a sense of self from holding these beliefs and engaging in these activities. Some commentators argue that, in modernity, the cornerstone of lifestyle construction is consumption behavior, which offers the possibility to create and further individualize the self with different products or services that signal different ways of life.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA