Neuroscience

Curcumin for amyloidosis and lipid metabolism—a novel insight

Curcumin is a polyphenol compound produced by plants of the Curcuma longa species and has been reported to have many physiological activities, which include anti-oxidation, anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer, and anti-amyloid ...

Medical research

Store fat or burn it? Targeting a single protein flips the switch

As obesity becomes a growing issue worldwide—nearly tripling over the last-half century—scientists are trying to gain a better understanding of the condition at the molecular level. Now, new research led by UC San Francisco ...

Neuroscience

Lipid epoxides target pain, inflammatory pathways in neurons

When modified using a process known as epoxidation, two naturally occurring lipids are converted into potent agents that target multiple cannabinoid receptors in neurons, interrupting pathways that promote pain and inflammation, ...

Medications

Type 2 diabetes: Drugs initially increase glucose production

Although SGLT-2 inhibitors are central to the treatment of diabetes, their exact mode of action was hitherto unknown. In a study conducted by a research group led by Peter Wolf, Martin Krssak and Michael Krebs from MedUni ...

Oncology & Cancer

Map shows how cancer cells spread through the body

The vast majority of cancer deaths are attributed to metastasis, or the spread of tumors from one organ to another. Determining if a cancer will metastasize has been all but impossible, but if it does, it becomes more difficult ...

Diabetes

How poor oral hygiene may result in metabolic syndrome

Periodontal or gum disease is known to be a significant risk factor of metabolic syndrome, a group of conditions increasing the risk for heart disease and diabetes. In a new study, researchers from Tokyo Medical and Dental ...

Medical research

New study debunks blood type diet

A study published in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics by researchers with the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine—a nonprofit of 12,000 doctors—debunks the 'blood type diet' by finding that ...

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Lipid

Lipids are a broad group of naturally-occurring molecules which includes fats, waxes, sterols, fat-soluble vitamins (such as vitamins A, D, E and K), monoglycerides, diglycerides, phospholipids, and others. The main biological functions of lipids include energy storage, as structural components of cell membranes, and as important signaling molecules.

Lipids may be broadly defined as hydrophobic or amphiphilic small molecules; the amphiphilic nature of some lipids allows them to form structures such as vesicles, liposomes, or membranes in an aqueous environment. Biological lipids originate entirely or in part from two distinct types of biochemical subunits or "building blocks": ketoacyl and isoprene groups. Using this approach, lipids may be divided into eight categories: fatty acyls, glycerolipids, glycerophospholipids, sphingolipids, saccharolipids and polyketides (derived from condensation of ketoacyl subunits); and sterol lipids and prenol lipids (derived from condensation of isoprene subunits).

Although the term lipid is sometimes used as a synonym for fats, fats are a subgroup of lipids called triglycerides. Lipids also encompass molecules such as fatty acids and their derivatives (including tri-, di-, and monoglycerides and phospholipids), as well as other sterol-containing metabolites such as cholesterol. Although humans and other mammals use various biosynthetic pathways to both break down and synthesize lipids, some essential lipids cannot be made this way and must be obtained from the diet.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA