Immunology

Gut throws cells overboard when chemical insults build up

A team of Duke researchers has discovered that cells lining the gut of zebrafish—and probably humans too—have a remarkable defense mechanism when faced with certain kinds of toxins: they hit the eject button.

Medical research

Researchers are one step closer to artificial livers

Prometheus, the mythological figure who stole fire from the gods, was punished for this theft by being bound to a rock. Each day, an eagle swept down and fed on his liver, which then grew back to be eaten again the next day.

Oncology & Cancer

Blocking tumor's 'death switch' paradoxically stops tumor growth

Every cell contains machinery for self-destruction, used to induce death when damaged or sick. But according to a new research study, a receptor thought to mediate cell suicide in normal cells may actually be responsible ...

Oncology & Cancer

Cancer most frequently spreads to the liver; here's why

When cancer spreads to another organ, it most commonly moves to the liver, and now researchers at the Abramson Cancer Center of the University of Pennsylvania say they know why. A new study, published today in Nature, shows ...

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