Psychology & Psychiatry

Creativity, a mating boost for the unattractive male

In the ruthless world of the mating game, plain-looking men instinctively know that being funny, smart or poetic helps to compensate for a less-than-stellar exterior.

Psychology & Psychiatry

Money really does matter in relationships: study

Our romantic choices are not just based on feelings and emotions, but how rich we feel compared to others, a new study published in Frontiers in Psychology has found.

Psychology & Psychiatry

Your gender-stereotypic genes may be giving you a leg up in dating

Your success at speed-dating might be influenced by your genetic make-up and your potential partner's ability to detect so-called "good genes," or genetic fitness. This is according to a study in Springer's journal Human ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Female gene changes post-sex may lead to mosquito controls

Genetic cues from male Aedes aegypti mosquitoes passed on during sex affect which genes are turned on or off in a females' reproductive tract post-mating, including genes related to blood feeding, egg development and immune ...

Neuroscience

Video: Social interactions and the brain

Many animals, from insects to humans, are social. Their brains have evolved to be sensitive to sensory cues that carry social information, such as: speech sounds, pheromones and visual cues. But very little is known about ...

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Mating

In biology, mating is the pairing of opposite-sex or hermaphroditic organisms for copulation and, in social animals, also to raise their offspring. For animals, mating methods include random mating, disassortative mating, assortative mating, or a mating pool.

In some birds, for example, it includes nest-building and feeding offspring. The human practice of making domesticated animals mate and of artificially inseminating them is part of animal husbandry.

Copulation is the union of the sex organs of two sexually reproducing animals for insemination and subsequent internal fertilization. The two individuals may be of opposite sexes or hermaphroditic, as is the case with, for example, snails.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA