Medications

Medication errors: Cut your risk with these tips

Medication errors refer to mistakes in prescribing, dispensing and giving medications. They injure hundreds of thousands of people every year in the United States. Yet most medication errors can be prevented. How can you ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Depression linked to suicidal ideation among physicians

Depression, but not physician burnout, is associated with suicidal ideation among physicians, while burnout is associated with increased self-reported medical errors, according to a study published online Dec. 9 in JAMA Network ...

Health

Lack of sleep tied to physician burnout, medical errors

Sleep-related impairment among physicians is associated with increased burnout, decreased professional fulfillment, and increased self-reported clinically significant medical error, according to a study published online Dec. ...

Pediatrics

New study reveals poisoning exposures in Australian schools

New research from the University of Sydney has found poisoning exposures in children and adolescents while at school are relatively common and appear to be increasing, highlighting the need for more robust prevention measures.

Radiology & Imaging

Body MRI reinterpretations plagued by discrepancies and errors

According to an article in ARRS' American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR), secondary interpretations of body MRI at tertiary care centers identify a high rate of discrepancies—with primary errors being interpretive in origin—suggesting ...

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Medical error

Medical error is an inaccurate or incomplete diagnosis and/or treatment of a disease; injury; syndrome; behavior; infection or other ailment.

In the U.S., medical errors are estimated to result in 44,000 to 98,000 unnecessary deaths and 1,000,000 excess injuries each year. One older extrapolation suggests '180,000 people die each year partly as a result of iatrogenic injury, the equivalent of three jumbo-jet crashes every 2 days'. It is estimated that in a typical 100 to 300 bed hospital in the United States, excess costs of $1,000,000 to $3,000,000 attributable to prolonged stays and complications just due to medication errors occur yearly.

However, medical error definitions are subject to debate, as there are many types of medical error from minor to major, and causality is often poorly determined. The Health Grades study statistics, based on AHRQ MedPAR data, were based on administrative records, not clinical records, and largely overlooked multi-causality of outcomes.

Medical care is frequently compared adversely to aviation: while many of the factors which lead to errors in both fields are similar, aviation's error management protocols are regarded as much more effective.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA