Medical research

Does a bigger brain make you smarter?

Increasing the size of neural circuits in the brain can boost learning performance, but this increased connectivity also has the potential to impede learning, new research has revealed.

Medical research

A new way of diagnosing and treating disease—without cutting skin

University of British Columbia researchers have developed a specialized microscope that has the potential ability to both diagnose diseases that include skin cancer and perform incredibly precise surgery—all without cutting ...

Alzheimer's disease & dementia

Brain changes linked with Alzheimer's years before symptoms appear

In a records review of 290 people at risk for Alzheimer's disease, scientists at Johns Hopkins say they have identified an average level of biological and anatomical brain changes linked to Alzheimer's disease that occur ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Using information technology to promote health equity

An innovative health information technology (IT) program helps primary care providers to detect and manage depression and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in traumatized refugees, reports a study in a special June supplement ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Q&A: Malaria continues to be a significant travel-related disease

Dear Mayo Clinic: I'm planning a three-week trip to Tanzania. My doctor recommends that I take medication to prevent malaria. Is this really necessary? I thought malaria wasn't common anymore. Are there other things that ...

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Drug

A drug, broadly speaking, is any substance that, when absorbed into the body of a living organism, alters normal bodily function. There is no single, precise definition, as there are different meanings in drug control law, government regulations, medicine, and colloquial usage.

In pharmacology, a drug is "a chemical substance used in the treatment, cure, prevention, or diagnosis of disease or used to otherwise enhance physical or mental well-being." Drugs may be prescribed for a limited duration, or on a regular basis for chronic disorders.

Recreational drugs are chemical substances that affect the central nervous system, such as opioids or hallucinogens. They may be used for perceived beneficial effects on perception, consciousness, personality, and behavior. Some drugs can cause addiction and/or habituation.

Drugs are usually distinguished from endogenous biochemicals by being introduced from outside the organism.[citation needed] For example, insulin is a hormone that is synthesized in the body; it is called a hormone when it is synthesized by the pancreas inside the body, but if it is introduced into the body from outside, it is called a drug.[citation needed] Many natural substances, such as beers, wines, and psychoactive mushrooms, blur the line between food and recreational drugs, as when ingested they affect the functioning of both mind and body and some substances normally considered drugs such as DMT (Dimethyltryptamine) are actually produced by the human body in trace amounts.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA