Oncology & Cancer

Cancer has ripple effect on distant tissues

A new study with zebrafish shows that a deadly form of skin cancer—melanoma—alters the metabolism of healthy tissues elsewhere in the body. The research from Washington University in St. Louis suggests that these other ...

Medical research

New hope against a rare, incurable eye cancer

A cutting-edge experimental drug cuts nearly in half the risk of death among patients with a rare but aggressive cancer of the eye, new clinical trial data show.

Oncology & Cancer

Thiazides may up risk for skin cancer in older adults

(HealthDay)—Higher exposure to thiazides is associated with increased rates of incident keratinocyte carcinoma and melanoma among older adults, according to a study published online April 12 in CMAJ, the journal of the ...

Oncology & Cancer

Study shows novel immunotherapy approach to fight melanoma

In a new study led by Yale Cancer Center, researchers have advanced a tumor-targeting and cell penetrating antibody that can deliver payloads to stimulate an immune response to help treat melanoma. The study was presented ...

Oncology & Cancer

Predicting mutated gene associated with melanoma

Although risk for melanoma, the most serious type of skin cancer, is often associated with ultraviolet light exposure, genetic factors are also at play, with some families being more prone to the disease than others.

Oncology & Cancer

A drug that can stop tumors from growing

Cancer doctors may soon have a new tool for treating melanoma and other types of cancer, thanks to work being done by researchers at the University of Colorado Cancer Center.

Oncology & Cancer

An amyloid link between Parkinson's disease and melanoma

On the surface, Parkinson's disease—a neurodegenerative disorder—and melanoma—a type of skin cancer—do not appear to have much in common. However, for nearly 50 years, doctors have recognized that Parkinson's disease ...

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Melanoma

Melanoma i/ˌmɛləˈnoʊmə/ (from Greek μέλας - melas, "dark") is a malignant tumor of melanocytes. Melanocytes are cells that produce the dark pigment, melanin, which is responsible for the color of skin. They predominantly occur in skin, but are also found in other parts of the body, including the bowel and the eye (see uveal melanoma). Melanoma can occur in any part of the body that contains melanocytes.

Melanoma is less common than other skin cancers. However, it is much more dangerous and causes the majority (75%) of deaths related to skin cancer. Worldwide, doctors diagnose about 160,000 new cases of melanoma yearly. The diagnosis is more frequent in women than in men and is particularly common among Caucasians living in sunny climates, with high rates of incidence in Australia, New Zealand, North America, Latin America, and northern Europe. According to a WHO report, about 48,000 melanoma related deaths occur worldwide per year.

The treatment includes surgical removal of the tumor, adjuvant treatment, chemo- and immunotherapy, or radiation therapy. The chance of a cure is greatest when the tumor is discovered while it is still small and thin, and can be entirely removed surgically.

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