Neuroscience

The secret of autobiographical memory is in assembly of cells

Of all forms of memory, episodic memory is the most intimate. We recall the sequences of events that happen to us—a marriage, a visit to a foreign country, a personal achievement—in great autobiographical detail. But ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Don't believe everything psychologists tell you about memory

Over the past couple of decades, there has been an explosion of research into "false memories," showing that our memory can be subtly altered by a variety of internal and external factors. Many psychologists think the public ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Overcoming PTSD: Study reveals memory disruption drug target

Fight or flight, panic, trembling: Our brains are wired to ensure we respond instantly to fear. While that fear response may save our lives in the dangerous moment, at times people stay on high alert long after the threat ...

Neuroscience

Your nose knows when it comes to stronger memories

Memories are stronger when the original experiences are accompanied by unpleasant odors, a team of researchers has found. The study broadens our understanding of what can drive Pavlovian responses and points to how negative ...

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Memory

In psychology, memory is an organism's mental ability to store, retain and recall information. Traditional studies of memory began in the fields of philosophy, including techniques of artificially enhancing the memory. The late nineteenth and early twentieth century put memory within the paradigms of cognitive psychology. In recent decades, it has become one of the principal pillars of a branch of science called cognitive neuroscience, an interdisciplinary link between cognitive psychology and neuroscience.

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