Cardiology

Microparticles fight inflammation post-heart attack

After a heart attack, much of the damage to the heart muscle is caused by inflammatory cells that rush to the scene of the oxygen-starved tissue. But that inflammatory damage is slashed in half when microparticles are injected ...

Medical research

Research sheds new light on how blood clots form

Scripps Research Institute scientists have discovered new elements of the blood clot-formation process. The findings could lead to better drugs for preventing heart attacks and other clot-related conditions.

Medical research

Engineering a better way to rebuild bone inside the body

Traumatic bone injuries such as blast wounds are often so severe that the body can't effectively repair the damage on its own. To aid the recovery, clinicians inject patients with proteins called growth factors. The treatment ...

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Microparticles

Microparticles are particles between 0.1 and 100 μm in size. Commercially available microparticles are available a wide variety of materials, including those made of ceramics, glass, polymers, and metals. One encounters microparticles everyday in nature with items such as pollen, sand, and dust. Many Microparticles can be found in your kitchen as well with items such as: flour, and powdered sugar.

Microparticles have a much larger surface-to-volume ratio than at the macroscale, and thus their behavior can be quite different. For example, metal microparticles can be explosive in air.

Microsphere are spherical microparticles, and are used where consistent and predictable particle surface area is important.

In biological systems, microparticles are small membrane bound vesicles circulating in the blood derived from cells that are in contact with the bloodstram such as platelets and endothelial cells. (see Endothelial microparticle). Because they retain the signature membrane protein composition of the parent cell, microparticles carry useful information and can be detected and characterized by Flow cytometry.

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