Neuroscience

Stress-related protein speeds progression of Alzheimer's disease

A stress-related protein genetically linked to depression, anxiety and other psychiatric disorders contributes to the acceleration of Alzheimer's disease, a new study led by researchers at the University of South Florida ...

Neuroscience

Researchers discover possible key to degenerative nerve diseases

(Medical Xpress) -- Researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and collaborators have discovered a powerful new protein in the eye of the fruit fly that may shed light on blinding diseases and other sensory problems ...

Alzheimer's disease & dementia

Molecular inhibitor breaks cycle that leads to Alzheimer's

A molecular chaperone has been found to inhibit a key stage in the development of Alzheimer's disease and break the toxic chain reaction that leads to the death of brain cells, a new study shows. The research provides an ...

Medical research

Alzheimer's and an unusual molecular chaperone

Among the hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease are the Alzheimer fibrils, deposits of the tau protein, which accumulate in nerve cells in the form of fibres and disrupt communication between nerve cells. But how does this fibre ...

Alzheimer's disease & dementia

Fighting Alzheimer's disease with protein origami

Alzheimer's disease is a progressive degenerative brain disease most commonly characterized by memory deficits. Loss of memory function, in particular, is known to be caused by neuronal damage arising from the misfolding ...

Medical research

Natural Alzheimer's weapon suggests better treatment

Scientists have shown a molecular chaperone is working like a waste management company to collect and detoxify high levels of toxic amyloid beta peptide found in Alzheimer's disease.

Medical research

Better treatment sought for acute lung injury

Patients can essentially drown in their own fluids when trauma and infection prompt blood vessels to leak, flooding millions of air sacs in their lungs.

Neuroscience

Worms learn to smell danger

Worms can learn. And the ways they learn and respond to danger could lead scientists to new treatments for people with neurodegenerative diseases.

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