Neuroscience

We need to fine-tune our 'maps' of the visual cortex, study shows

Monkey brain scans have revealed new information about the brain structure that processes visual information. The findings were recently presented in PNAS by neurophysiologists Qi Qhu (KU Leuven) and Wim Vanduffel (KU Leuven/ ...

Medical research

Gene-edited disease monkeys cloned in China

The first cohort of five gene-edited monkey clones made from fibroblasts of a monkey with disease phenotypes were born recently at the Institute of Neuroscience (ION) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) in Shanghai. ...

Neuroscience

Neuroscientist discovers hidden region in the human brain

World-renowned cartographer of the brain, Scientia Professor George Paxinos, Conjoint Professor at UNSW, has discovered a hidden region of the human brain. The region is found near the brain-spinal cord junction and Professor ...

Neuroscience

Researchers discover neural code that predicts behavior

Scientists at the National Eye Institute (NEI) have found that neurons in the superior colliculus, an ancient midbrain structure found in all vertebrates, are key players in allowing us to detect visual objects and events. ...

Neuroscience

Monkey gaze study shows dopamine's role in response inhibition

University of Tsukuba researchers report the importance of the brain's dopaminergic system for inhibiting already-planned actions. They trained monkeys to redirect their gaze toward targets presented on a screen, apart from ...

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Monkey

Cebidae Aotidae Pitheciidae Atelidae Cercopithecidae

A monkey is any cercopithecoid (Old World monkey) or platyrrhine (New World monkey) primate. All primates that are not prosimians (lemurs and tarsiers) or apes are monkeys. The 264 known extant monkey species represent two of the three groupings of simian primates (the third group being the 21 species of apes). Monkeys are usually smaller and/or longer-tailed than apes.

The New World monkeys are classified within the parvorder Platyrrhini, whereas the Old World monkeys (superfamily Cercopithecoidea) form part of the parvorder Catarrhini, which also includes the apes. Thus, scientifically speaking, monkeys are paraphyletic (not a single coherent group), and Old World monkeys are actually more closely related to the apes than they are to the New World monkeys.

Due to its size (up to 1 m/3 ft) the Mandrill is often thought to be an ape, but it is actually an Old World monkey. Also, a few monkey species have the word "ape" in their common name.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA