Medications

Animal study shows safety of using CBD and THC with opioids

Findings from a new animal study suggest that cannabidiol (CBD) and tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) might be safe for use with opioid pain relievers. Although more studies are needed, the results suggest that these compounds might ...

Neuroscience

Converting sound to touch

According to estimates by the World Health Organization (WHO) more than 5% of the world's population is affected by hearing loss and deafness, which is mostly caused by loss of hair cells in the ear. For future treatment, ...

Medical research

How our unique brain takes shape during mid-pregnancy

About four or five months after conception, a burst of synaptic growth begins in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) of the human fetus. And within this tangled mass of connections, the developing brain acquires the unique properties ...

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Monkey

Cebidae Aotidae Pitheciidae Atelidae Cercopithecidae

A monkey is any cercopithecoid (Old World monkey) or platyrrhine (New World monkey) primate. All primates that are not prosimians (lemurs and tarsiers) or apes are monkeys. The 264 known extant monkey species represent two of the three groupings of simian primates (the third group being the 21 species of apes). Monkeys are usually smaller and/or longer-tailed than apes.

The New World monkeys are classified within the parvorder Platyrrhini, whereas the Old World monkeys (superfamily Cercopithecoidea) form part of the parvorder Catarrhini, which also includes the apes. Thus, scientifically speaking, monkeys are paraphyletic (not a single coherent group), and Old World monkeys are actually more closely related to the apes than they are to the New World monkeys.

Due to its size (up to 1 m/3 ft) the Mandrill is often thought to be an ape, but it is actually an Old World monkey. Also, a few monkey species have the word "ape" in their common name.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA