Medical research

Using robotics technology to fight breast cancer

Vincent Groenhuis, a Ph.D. candidate at the University of Twente, has spent the past four years working on the fight against breast cancer. Using various prototypes of 3-D-printed biopsy robots, he has been able to develop ...

Oncology & Cancer

Novel MRI-guided ultrasound treatment destroys prostate cancer

A novel MRI-guided procedure that uses therapeutic ultrasound effectively treats prostate cancer with minimal side effects, according to a new study presented today at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North ...

Radiology & Imaging

Improved biopsies with MRI-compatible ultrasound system

Biopsies are standard procedures in interventional radiology, not least for patients with a suspected tumor. In this instance, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is increasingly the method of choice for guiding minimally invasive ...

Neuroscience

Virtual treasure hunt shows brain maps time sequence of memories

People have little difficulty remembering the chronology of events, determining how much time passed between two events, and which one occurred first. Apparently, memories of events in the brain are linked when they occur ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Imagine: Our attitudes can change solely by the power of imagination

Sometimes in life there are special places that seem to stand out to us—a school playground, perhaps an old church, or that inconspicuous street corner where you were kissed for the first time. Before the kiss you had never ...

Oncology & Cancer

Whole body MRI may help to detect spread of cancers more quickly

Trials with people with newly-diagnosed colorectal and non-small cell lung cancer suggest that whole body MRI could reduce the time it takes to diagnose the stage of cancers. The results are from two prospective trials with ...

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Magnetic resonance imaging

Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), or nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMRI), is primarily a medical imaging technique most commonly used in radiology to visualize the internal structure and function of the body. MRI provides much greater contrast between the different soft tissues of the body than computed tomography (CT) does, making it especially useful in neurological (brain), musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, and oncological (cancer) imaging. Unlike CT, it uses no ionizing radiation, but uses a powerful magnetic field to align the nuclear magnetization of (usually) hydrogen atoms in water in the body. Radio frequency (RF) fields are used to systematically alter the alignment of this magnetization, causing the hydrogen nuclei to produce a rotating magnetic field detectable by the scanner. This signal can be manipulated by additional magnetic fields to build up enough information to construct an image of the body.:36

Magnetic Resonance Imaging is a relatively new technology. The first MR image was published in 1973 and the first cross-sectional image of a living mouse was published in January 1974. The first studies performed on humans were published in 1977. By comparison, the first human X-ray image was taken in 1895.

Magnetic Resonance Imaging was developed from knowledge gained in the study of nuclear magnetic resonance. In its early years the technique was referred to as nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMRI). However, as the word nuclear was associated in the public mind with ionizing radiation exposure it is generally now referred to simply as MRI. Scientists still use the term NMRI when discussing non-medical devices operating on the same principles. The term Magnetic Resonance Tomography (MRT) is also sometimes used.

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