Neuroscience

Rhythmic control of 'brain waves' can boost memory: study

Controlling the frequency of 'brain waves' could help to improve people's recall of memories and potentially provide a key to unlock conditions such as Alzheimer's disease, according to a new article.

Neuroscience

Waves move across the human brain to support memory

The coordination of neural activity across widespread brain networks is essential for human cognition. Researchers have long assumed that oscillations in the brain, commonly measured for research purposes, brain-computer ...

Neuroscience

Why some images trigger seizures

In people with photosensitive epilepsy, flashing lights are well known for their potential to trigger seizures. The results can be quite stunning. For instance, a particular episode of Pokémon sent 685 people in Japan to ...

Neuroscience

It don't mean a thing if the brain ain't got that swing

Like Duke Ellington's 1931 jazz standard, the human brain improvises while its rhythm section keeps up a steady beat. But when it comes to taking on intellectually challenging tasks, groups of neurons tune in to one another ...

Neuroscience

New non-invasive method for brain research

Neuroscientists at the University of Tübingen have become the first to record neuromagnetic activity in the millisecond-by-millisecond range while the brain of a human subject was under stimulation by electric current. Electric ...

Neuroscience

How our sense of touch is a lot like the way we hear

(Medical Xpress)—When you walk into a darkened room, your first instinct is to feel around for a light switch. You slide your hand along the wall, feeling the transition from the doorframe to the painted drywall, and then ...

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