Oncology & Cancer

Prozac fights deadly childhood brain cancer

The anti-depressant drug Prozac could be used to tackle one of the deadliest childhood tumours and possibly other types of cancer, scientists said.

Oncology & Cancer

Research sheds important light on the metastasis of neuroblastoma

Neuroblastoma can grow and spread in the body very aggressively, making it very difficult to treat. New research has shed important light on the factors at play in the metastasis of neuroblastoma, which could potentially ...

Oncology & Cancer

Neuroblastoma: Improved treatment prospects in future

Neuroblastoma is a rare form of malignant tumor, primarily affecting children under the age of six. A research team led by molecular pathologist Lukas Kenner from MedUni Vienna's Department of Pathology has now discovered, ...

Oncology & Cancer

More children survive neuroblastoma

Both the survival rate and the incidence of neuroblastoma have increased in recent years, as was shown by a study from the Princess Máxima Center. The improved chance of survival and the increase in the number of patients ...

Oncology & Cancer

Researchers find new way to target childhood cancer

An Australian-led international research effort has broken fresh ground in the race to find more effective treatments for the childhood cancer neuroblastoma, by uncovering a new and as-yet unexploited target in cancer cells ...

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Neuroblastoma

Neuroblastoma is the most common extracranial solid cancer in childhood and the most common cancer in infancy, with an annual incidence of about 650 new cases per year in the US. Close to 50 percent of neuroblastoma cases occur in children younger than two years old. It is a neuroendocrine tumor, arising from any neural crest element of the sympathetic nervous system or SNS. It most frequently originates in one of the adrenal glands, but can also develop in nerve tissues in the neck, chest, abdomen, or pelvis.

Neuroblastoma is one of the few human malignancies known to demonstrate spontaneous regression from an undifferentiated state to a completely benign cellular appearance.

A disease exhibiting extreme heterogeneity, neuroblastoma is stratified into three risk categories: low, intermediate, and high risk. Low-risk disease is most common in infants and highly curable with observation only or surgery, whereas high-risk disease is difficult to cure even with the most intensive multi-modal therapies available.

Note: Esthesioneuroblastoma, also known as olfactory neuroblastoma, is believed to arise from the olfactory epithelium and its classification remains controversial. However, since it is not a sympathetic nervous system malignancy it is a distinct clinical entity and is not to be confused with neuroblastoma.

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