Neuroscience

How memories form and fade

Why is it that you can remember the name of your childhood best friend that you haven't seen in years yet easily forget the name of a person you just met a moment ago? In other words, why are some memories stable over decades, ...

Neuroscience

New method classifies brain cells based on electrical signals

For decades, neuroscientists have relied on a technique for reading out electrical "spikes" of brain activity in live, behaving subjects that tells them very little about the types of cells they are monitoring. In a new study, ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Care less with helmet

The significance of some objects is so deeply entrenched in our psyche that we rely on them even when they are not actually helpful. This is the case with a bike helmet. Since our childhood, we learn that we are more protected ...

Neuroscience

Computing hubs in the hippocampus and cortex

Neural computation occurs in large neural networks within dynamic brain states, yet it remains poorly understood if the functions are performed by a specific subset of neurons or if they occurred in specific, dynamic regions. ...

Neuroscience

Could heavier folks be at lower risk for ALS?

It's not often that anything good is associated with obesity. Yet heavy folks and those who bulk up as they age may have less risk for the deadly disease amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a new study finds.

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