Neuroscience

How memories form and fade

Why is it that you can remember the name of your childhood best friend that you haven't seen in years yet easily forget the name of a person you just met a moment ago? In other words, why are some memories stable over decades, ...

Neuroscience

Paralyzed mice with spinal cord injury made to walk again

Most people with spinal cord injury are paralyzed from the injury site down, even when the cord isn't completely severed. Why don't the spared portions of the spinal cord keep working? Researchers at Boston Children's Hospital ...

Ophthalmology

New eye drops may prevent a common cause of blindness

Researchers at Columbia University Irving Medical Center have developed eye drops that could prevent vision loss after retinal vein occlusion, a major cause of blindness for millions of adults worldwide.

Neuroscience

Star-shaped brain cells may play a critical role in glaucoma

After a brain injury, cells that normally nourish nerves may actually kill them instead, a new study in rodents finds. This "reactive" phenomenon may be the driving factor behind neurodegenerative diseases like glaucoma, ...

HIV & AIDS

A new way to study HIV's impact on the brain

Though many negative repercussions of human immunodeficiency virus infection can be mitigated with the use of antiretroviral therapy (ART), one area where medical advances haven't made as much progress is in the reduction ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Consequences of Zika virus infection on glial cells

Studies regarding the brain damage caused by the Zika virus have revealed the virus' predilection for a certain neural cell: the astrocyte. However, few studies have sought to identify the infection effects on these cells, ...

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