Neuroscience

How memories form and fade

Why is it that you can remember the name of your childhood best friend that you haven't seen in years yet easily forget the name of a person you just met a moment ago? In other words, why are some memories stable over decades, ...

Neuroscience

Researchers cure epilepsy in mice using brain cells

UCSF scientists controlled seizures in epileptic mice with a one-time transplantation of medial ganglionic eminence (MGE) cells, which inhibit signaling in overactive nerve circuits, into the hippocampus, a brain region associated ...

Neuroscience

Neural codes for memory implants

(Medical Xpress)—The ability to short-circuit debilitating tremors in disease states with implantable stimulators is nothing short of remarkable. The same can be said for cochlear prosthetics which restore hearing, and ...

Neuroscience

When unconscious, the brain is anything but 'silent'

The cerebral cortex is thought to be the seat of conscious processing in the brain. Rather than being inactivated, specific cells in the cortex show higher spontaneous activity during general anesthesia than when awake, and ...

Medical research

How foodborne diseases protect the gut's nervous system

A simple stomach bug could do a lot of damage. There are 100 million neurons scattered along the gastrointestinal tract—directly in the line of fire—that can be stamped out by gut infections, potentially leading to long-term ...

Medical research

Research team unlocks strategies driving neuron connections

Using high-resolution imaging and 3-D computer modeling, a University of Oregon research team has found that the branching arms of neurons weave through space in a way that balances their need to connect to other neurons ...

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