Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Updated reviews issued for oseltamivir, zanamivir use in flu

(HealthDay)—Oseltamivir and zanamivir reduce the time to symptomatic improvement in influenza by about half a day, but evidence to support claims of reduced admissions to hospital or complications of influenza is lacking, ...

Pediatrics

Take kids to get their flu shots early, experts say

(HealthDay)—As soon as the updated seasonal flu vaccine becomes available, parents should bring children aged 6 months and older to get vaccinated, according to an updated policy statement from the American Academy of Pediatrics ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Improved molecular tools streamline influenza testing and management

Over 40,000 people die each year in the United States from influenza-related diseases. In patients whose immune systems are compromised, antiviral therapy may be life-saving, but it needs to be initiated quickly. It is therefore ...

Medications

Beware fake flu treatments, FDA warns

(HealthDay)—With the height of flu season here, the U.S Food and Drug Administration warns consumers to avoid fraudulent products that claim to prevent, treat or cure the flu.

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Oseltamivir

Oseltamivir INN ( /ɒsəlˈtæmɨvɪər/), an antiviral drug, slows the spread of influenza (flu) virus between cells in the body by stopping the virus from chemically cutting ties with its host cell; median time to symptom alleviation is reduced by 0.5–1 day. The drug is sold under the trade name Tamiflu, and is taken orally in capsules or as a suspension. It has been used to treat and prevent influenza A virus and influenza B virus infection in over 50 million people since 1999.[citation needed]

Oseltamivir is a prodrug, a (relatively) inactive chemical which is converted into its active form by metabolic process after it is taken into the body. It was the first orally active neuraminidase inhibitor commercially developed.[citation needed] It was developed by C.U. Kim, W. Lew, and X. Chen of US-based Gilead Sciences, and is currently marketed by Hoffmann–La Roche (Roche). In Japan, it is marketed by Chugai Pharmaceutical Co., which is more than 50% owned by Roche.

As of December 2010[update], the World Health Organization (WHO) reported 314 samples of the prevalent 2009 pandemic H1N1 flu tested worldwide have shown resistance to oseltamivir.

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