Surgery

Pediatric otolaryngology practice continues to evolve

(HealthDay)—The pediatric otolaryngology (ORL) specialty has evolved over the past decade, with a notable decline in involvement in facial plastic and reconstructive surgery, according to a study published online Feb. 22 ...

Pediatrics

Even kiddie pools pose danger

(HealthDay)—Just a few inches of water in a kiddie pool are enough to drown a child.

Medical research

Auditory deprivation from hearing loss may cause cognitive decline

A University of Arizona collaborative study among the Departments of Otolaryngology – Head & Neck Surgery; Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences; and Psychology received approval in early May to begin accepting human subjects ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Team explores links between grammar, rhythm

A child's ability to distinguish musical rhythm is related to his or her capacity for understanding grammar, according to a recent study from a researcher at the Vanderbilt Kennedy Center.

Medical research

Hearing loss from loud blasts may be treatable, researchers say

Long-term hearing loss from loud explosions, such as blasts from roadside bombs, may not be as irreversible as previously thought, according to a new study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine.

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Otolaryngology

Otolaryngology or ENT (ear, nose and throat) is the branch of medicine and surgery that specializes in the diagnosis and treatment of ear, nose, throat, and head and neck disorders.

The full name of the specialty is otorhinolaryngology; the full term otorhinolaryngology (neoclassical Greek and modern Greek: ὠτο(ρ)ρινολαρυγγολογία), also includes ῥινο- - rhino- (root of ῥίς) "nose". The term comes from the Classical Greek roots ὠτ- - ot- (root of οὖς) "ear", λαρυγγ- - laryng- (root of λάρυγξ) "larynx/throat", and the root -logy "study", and it literally means "the study of ear and throat".

Some people refer to it as head and neck surgery. Practitioners are called otolaryngologists–head and neck surgeons, or sometimes otorhinolaryngologists (ORL).

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