Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

You probably don't need to worry about flesh-eating bacteria

Like humans, many bacteria like to spend time at the beach. The so-called flesh-eating bacteria, Vibrio vulnificus, don't just like the beach; they need it, and rely on seasalt for survival. And as with human beachgoers, ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Sun-exposed oyster mushrooms help patients fight tuberculosis

Tuberculosis (TB) remains one of the deadliest infectious diseases in low income countries, with around 1.6 million people dying of the disease each year. In a new study, researchers show that sun-exposed oyster mushrooms ...

Immunology

Study identifies biomedical potential of bivalves

Shellfish like oysters and mussels have the potential to revolutionize human health research, according to a new paper in Developmental and Comparative Immunology. The study reveals how using bivalves as model organisms offers ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Oysters harbor, transmit human norovirus: Avoid raw ones

Oysters not only transmit human norovirus; they also serve as a major reservoir for these pathogens, according to research published August 28 in Applied and Environmental Microbiology, a journal of the American Society for ...

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Oyster

The word oyster is used as a common name for a number of distinct groups of bivalve molluscs which live in marine or brackish habitats. The valves are highly calcified.

Some kinds of oyster are commonly consumed, cooked or raw, by humans. Other kinds, such as pearl oysters, are not. These are considered an aphrodisiac.

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