News tagged with pain medication

Related topics: pain

Risk of heart disease associated with NSAIDs

Dear Mayo Clinic: Is it true that taking prescription-strength nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, or NSAIDs, can increase my risk of heart disease? How much is too much, and should I be concerned about regularly taking ...

May 08, 2017
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Can trusting your doctor help reduce pain?

Getting a shot at your doctor's office can be a stressful experience. But what if you knew your doctor was from your hometown, liked the same food as you, or shared your religious beliefs? Now that you feel more culturally ...

May 04, 2017
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Methadone may reduce need for opioids after surgery

Patients undergoing spinal fusion surgery who are treated with methadone during the procedure require significantly less intravenous and oral opioids to manage postoperative pain, reports a new study published in the May ...

Apr 24, 2017
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Analgesic

An analgesic (also known as a painkiller) is any member of the diverse group of drugs used to relieve pain (achieve analgesia). The word analgesic derives from Greek an- ("without") and algos ("pain"). Analgesic drugs act in various ways on the peripheral and central nervous systems; they include paracetamol (acetaminophen), the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as the salicylates, narcotic drugs such as morphine, synthetic drugs with narcotic properties such as tramadol, and various others.

In choosing analgesics, the severity and response to other medication determines the choice of agent; the WHO pain ladder, originally developed in cancer-related pain, is widely applied to find suitable drugs in a stepwise manner. The analgesic choice is also determined by the type of pain: for neuropathic pain, traditional analgesics are less effective, and there is often benefit from classes of drugs that are not normally considered analgesics, such as tricyclic antidepressants and anticonvulsants.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA

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