Gerontology & Geriatrics

Feelings of fatigue predict death in older adults

How fatigued certain activities make an older person feel can predict the likelihood death is less than three years away, according to research published today in the Journal of Gerontology: Medical Sciences by University ...

Medications

Semaglutide superior to liraglutide for weight loss

(HealthDay)—Among adults with overweight or obesity, once-weekly subcutaneous semaglutide plus counseling for diet and physical activity results in significantly greater weight loss at 68 weeks than once-daily subcutaneous ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

New study highlights ways multiple disasters impact public health

Findings from a review conducted by University of Melbourne researchers shows multiple disasters can have complex impacts on physical health, mental health and well-being which go beyond what has been observed after single ...

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Physics

Physics (Greek: physis – φύσις meaning "nature") is a natural science; it is the study of matter and its motion through spacetime and all that derives from these, such as energy and force. More broadly, it is the general analysis of nature, conducted in order to understand how the world and universe behave.

Physics is one of the oldest academic disciplines, perhaps the oldest through its inclusion of astronomy. Over the last two millennia, physics had been considered synonymous with philosophy, chemistry, and certain branches of mathematics and biology, but during the Scientific Revolution in the 16th century, it emerged to become a unique modern science in its own right. However, in some subject areas such as in mathematical physics and quantum chemistry, the boundaries of physics remain difficult to distinguish.

Physics is both significant and influential, in part because advances in its understanding have often translated into new technologies, but also because new ideas in physics often resonate with the other sciences, mathematics and philosophy.

For example, advances in the understanding of electromagnetism led directly to the development of new products which have dramatically transformed modern-day society (e.g., television, computers, and domestic appliances); advances in thermodynamics led to the development of motorized transport; and advances in mechanics inspired the development of calculus.

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