Psychology & Psychiatry

The unpopular truth about biases toward people with disabilities

Needing to ride in a wheelchair can put the brakes on myriad opportunities—some less obvious than one might think. New research from Michigan State University sheds light on the bias people have toward people with disabilities, ...

Dentistry

Root canal work not so bad after all

Root canal work is not as bad as people think when compared to other dental procedures. Self-reporting of their dental health suggests that patients find the procedure no worse than other dental work which overturns the popular ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Using virtual reality could make you a better person in real life

If you've ever participated in a virtual reality (VR) experience, you might have found yourself navigating the virtual world as an avatar. If you haven't, you probably recognise the experience from its portrayal in film and ...

Health

Heavy metal music can have health benefits for fans

Due to its extreme sound and aggressive lyrics, heavy metal music is often associated with controversy. Among the genre's most contentious moments, there have been instances of blasphemous merchandise, accusations of promoting ...

Health

Is 'clean eating' just dirty rhetoric?

New research published today in the Journal of Eating Disorders finds "clean eating" is perceived as overwhelmingly positive by young people, but those optimistic impressions of "clean diets" may signal a risk for eating ...

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Popularity

Popularity is the quality of being well-liked or common, or having a high social status. Popularity figures are an important part of many people's personal value systems and form a vital component of success in people-oriented fields such as management, politics, and entertainment, among others.[citation needed]

Borrowed from the Latin popularis in 1490, originally meant common or "being well-liked". The use of the word popular to mean the "fact or condition of being well liked by the people" is seen originally in 1601.

Many different variations of popularity exist, and many ways in which to gain it. General popularity usually involves respect in two directions: a popular person is respected by peers and will reciprocate that respect, thus reinforcing the belief of deserving the popularity. Likewise, amicability is an important component of popularity, as a person who does not like others is unlikely to be liked by others. This reciprocal nature of interpersonal popularity is often overlooked by people (particularly the young) who are attempting to become popular: being loud may be successful in gaining attention, but is unlikely to provide mutual respect.

Neuroimaging identifies the anterior insula and anterior cingulate as key areas in the brain determining whether people prefer something in regard to its being popular with their peer group. The influence of one's peer group upon them is strongest during adolescence.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA