Psychology & Psychiatry

Rest may help reduce PTSD symptoms, study finds

A period of rest following a traumatic event can reduce the subsequent development of involuntary 'memory intrusions', one of the hallmark symptoms in post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), a new UCL study has found.

Neuroscience

The brain may actively forget during dream sleep

Rapid eye movement, or REM, sleep is a fascinating period when most of our dreams are made. Now, in a study of mice, a team of Japanese and U.S. researchers show that it may also be a time when the brain actively forgets. ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Meaningful PTSD symptom decrease may lower type 2 diabetes risk

Research from Saint Louis University finds treatment for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) that leads to an improvement in symptoms was associated with a 49 percent lower risk of incident type 2 diabetes.

Health

Acupuncture equals disease prevention say new studies

Well-recognized for its therapeutic effects, acupuncture is increasingly being appreciated for its ability to promote wellness and contribute to the prevention of a broad range of conditions. A new study, which demonstrates ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Children develop PTSD when they 'overthink' their trauma

Children are more likely to suffer Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) if they think their reaction to traumatic events is not 'normal' - according to new research from the University of East Anglia.

Psychology & Psychiatry

Study shows 33% of workers at homeless shelters suffer PTSD

It's probably no surprise that many people who experience homelessness have experienced trauma in their lives. However, a new study led by the University of Calgary Faculty of Social Work shows that a surprisingly large number ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Toward an improved treatment of anxiety disorders

Traumatic experiences can become deeply entrenched in a person's memory. How can fears following a traumatic event be reduced in the long term and prevented from becoming a permanent stress-related disorder? Researchers at ...

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Posttraumatic stress disorder

Posttraumatic stress disorder (abbreviated PTSD) is an anxiety disorder that can develop after exposure to one or more traumatic events that threatened or caused great physical harm.

It is a severe and ongoing emotional reaction to an extreme psychological trauma. This stressor may involve someone's actual death, a threat to the patient's or someone else's life, serious physical injury, an unwanted sexual act, or a threat to physical or psychological integrity, overwhelming psychological defenses.

In some cases it can also be from profound psychological and emotional trauma, apart from any actual physical harm. Often, however, incidents involving both things are found to be the cause.

PTSD is a more chronic and less frequent consequence of trauma than the normal acute stress response.

PTSD has also been recognized in the past as railway spine, stress syndrome, shell shock, battle fatigue, traumatic war neurosis, or post-traumatic stress syndrome.

Diagnostic symptoms include reexperience, such as flashbacks and nightmares; avoidance of stimuli associated with the trauma; and increased arousal, such as difficulty falling or staying asleep, anger, and hypervigilance. Per definition, the symptoms last more than six months and cause significant impairment in social, occupational, or other important areas of functioning (e.g. problems with work and relationships).

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