Psychology & Psychiatry

What comforts targets of prejudice the most

Rare in history are moments like the 1960s civil rights movement, in which members of a majority group vocally support minority groups in their fight against prejudice. New research not only confirms the power of speaking ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Prejudice linked to women's menstrual cycle

Women's bias against male strangers increases when women are fertile, suggesting prejudice may be partly fueled by genetics, according to a study by Michigan State University psychology researchers.

Psychology & Psychiatry

White people show race bias when judging deception

When making judgments about who is lying and who is telling the truth, new research shows that White people are more likely to label a Black person as a truth-teller compared with a White person, even though their spontaneous ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

People assume sexists are also racist and vice versa

The stigma associated with prejudice against women and people of color seems to transfer from one group to another, according to new findings published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological ...

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Prejudice

Prejudice (or foredeeming) is making a judgment or assumption about someone or something before having enough knowledge to be able to do so with guaranteed accuracy, or "judging a book by its cover". The word prejudice is most often used to refer to preconceived judgments toward people or a person because of race, social class, ethnicity, age, disability, obesity, religion, sexual orientation, or other personal characteristics. It also means beliefs without knowledge of the facts and may include "any unreasonable attitude that is unusually resistant to rational influence."

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