Oncology & Cancer

Breast cancer patients could benefit from controversial hormone

An international team of researchers involving the University of Adelaide is tackling the controversy over what some scientists consider to be a "harmful" hormone, arguing that it could be a game changer in the fight against ...

Oncology & Cancer

Treating breast cancer with progesterone could aid survival

A special technique where breast cancer cells are "rescued" for research has been developed at the University of Adelaide. Coupled with advanced scientific technologies pioneered by Cambridge University this has provided ...

Obstetrics & gynaecology

'Science' features advances in preterm birth

The Aug. 15 edition of the journal Science features a major article about the most important problem in obstetrics: preterm labor. The article, "Preterm labor: one syndrome, many causes," delivers a powerful message: preterm ...

Medical research

New pregnancy hormone identified in horses

Identification of a new pregnancy-supporting hormone in horses has resolved a reproductive mystery that has puzzled scientists for decades, and it may have important implications for sustaining human pregnancies, reports ...

Immunology

Immune cells essential to establishing pregnancy

New research from the University of Adelaide shows for the first time that immune cells known as macrophages are critical to fertility by creating a healthy hormone environment in the uterus.

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Progesterone

Progesterone also known as P4 (pregn-4-ene-3,20-dione) is a C-21 steroid hormone involved in the female menstrual cycle, pregnancy (supports gestation) and embryogenesis of humans and other species. Progesterone belongs to a class of hormones called progestogens, and is the major naturally occurring human progestogen.

Progesterone is commonly manufactured from the yam family, Dioscorea. Dioscorea produces large amounts of a steroid called diosgenin, which can be converted into progesterone in the laboratory.

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