Cardiology

A kinase identified as possible target to treat heart failure

An unexplored kinase in heart muscle cells may be a good target to treat heart failure, a disease that is only incrementally delayed by existing therapies. Failing human hearts showed reduced amounts of this kinase, and preclinical ...

Medical research

Putting the squeeze on red blood cells

For the first time, researchers at the University of Bristol's Blood and Transplant Research Unit, and the French National Institute for Blood Transfusion, have captured the moment a red blood cell is "squeezed" while recording ...

Oncology & Cancer

Scientists develop possible strategy for cancer drug resistance

Scientists from the National Institutes of Health and Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center have devised a potential treatment against a common type of leukemia that could have implications for many other types of ...

Medical research

Toxin responsible for Legionella growth identified

A team of scientists led by EMBL group leader Sagar Bhogaraju and Ivan Dikic of Goethe University, Frankfurt, discovered that the toxin SidJ in Legionella bacteria enforces a unique modification on human proteins and helps ...

Medical research

Researchers create a new molecule to treat heart failure

A group of researchers based in Brazil and the United States have developed a molecule that halts the progression of heart failure and improves the heart's capacity to pump blood. Rats with heart failure were treated for ...

Oncology & Cancer

Protein loss promotes cell migration

The protein STK17A (serine threonine kinase 17A) appears to play roles in various cancer types. It can be oncogenic or tumor suppressive, depending on the cancer, but its role in colorectal cancer has not been established.

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Protein kinase

A protein kinase is a kinase enzyme that modifies other proteins by chemically adding phosphate groups to them (phosphorylation). Phosphorylation usually results in a functional change of the target protein (substrate) by changing enzyme activity, cellular location, or association with other proteins. The human genome contains about 500 protein kinase genes and they constitute about 2% of all human genes. Protein kinases are also found in bacteria and plants. Up to 30% of all human proteins may be modified by kinase activity, and kinases are known to regulate the majority of cellular pathways, especially those involved in signal transduction.

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