Neuroscience

Lefty, righty brains count on same area for numbers

Lefties and righties may put pen to paper from different sides of the page, but when it comes to numbers, everything adds up using the same point in the brain, according to a recent Western study. The findings offer one more ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Even or odd: No easy feat for the mind

Even scientists are fond of thinking of the human brain as a computer, following sets of rules to communicate, make decisions and find a meal.

Psychology & Psychiatry

Language can reveal the invisible, study shows

It is natural to imagine that the sense of sight takes in the world as it is—simply passing on what the eyes collect from light reflected by the objects around us.

Psychology & Psychiatry

Human brains are hardwired for empathy, friendship, study shows

Perhaps one of the most defining features of humanity is our capacity for empathy – the ability to put ourselves in others' shoes. A new University of Virginia study strongly suggests that we are hardwired to empathize ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

To suppress or to explore? Emotional strategy may influence anxiety

When trouble approaches, what do you do? Run for the hills? Hide? Pretend it isn't there? Or do you focus on the promise of rain in those looming dark clouds? New research suggests that the way you regulate your emotions, ...

Neuroscience

New study shows different brains have similar responses to music

Do the brains of different people listening to the same piece of music actually respond in the same way? An imaging study by Stanford University School of Medicine scientists says the answer is yes, which may in part explain ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Lovers' hearts beat in sync, study says

(Medical Xpress)—When modern-day crooner Trey Songz sings, "Cause girl, my heart beats for you," in his romantic ballad, "Flatline," his lyrics could be telling a tale that's as much physiological as it is emotional, according ...

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