Health

Reducing medical errors with wireless technologies

Medical mistakes happen every day, even with the best doctors and nurses. One way to reduce medical errors is to adopt new wireless technologies that improve health care and reduce costs, according to researchers with Virginia ...

Medications

Blood-tracking device uses new technology

(HealthDay)—The first device to use Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) technology to help workers track blood products and prevent the release of unsuitable samples has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

Autism spectrum disorders

Augmented play helps autism

Playing with interactive toys could help children with autism to improve their social interaction with other children, say University of Sussex psychologists.

Radio-frequency identification

Radio-frequency identification (RFID) is the use of an object (typically referred to as an RFID tag) applied to or incorporated into a product, animal, or person for the purpose of identification and tracking using radio waves. Some tags can be read from several meters away and beyond the line of sight of the reader.

Most RFID tags contain at least two parts. One is an integrated circuit for storing and processing information, modulating and demodulating a radio-frequency (RF) signal, and other specialized functions. The second is an antenna for receiving and transmitting the signal.

There are generally three types of RFID tags: active RFID tags, which contain a battery and can transmit signals autonomously, passive RFID tags, which have no battery and require an external source to provoke signal transmission and battery assisted passive (BAP) which require an external source to wake up but have significant higher forward link capability providing great read range.

Today, RFID is used in enterprise supply chain management to improve the efficiency of inventory tracking and management.

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