Neuroscience

Neuronal recycling: This is how our brain allows us to read

Letters, syllables, words and sentences—these are spatially arranged sets of symbols that acquire meaning when we read them. But is there an area and cognitive mechanism in our brain that is specifically devoted to reading? ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Children with dyslexia show stronger emotional responses

Children diagnosed with dyslexia show greater emotional reactivity than children without dyslexia, according to a new collaborative study by UC San Francisco neuroscientists with the UCSF Dyslexia Center and UCSF Memory and ...

Health

Federal and state websites flunk COVID-19 reading-level review

Information about COVID-19 offered by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the White House, and state health departments failed to meet recommendations for communicating with the public, according to a Dartmouth ...

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Reading, Berkshire

Coordinates: 51°27′15″N 0°58′23″W / 51.4541°N 0.9730°W / 51.4541; -0.9730

Reading (pronounced /ˈrɛdɪŋ/ ( listen) (RED-ing)) is a large town in England, located at the confluence of the River Thames and River Kennet, midway between London and Swindon off the M4 motorway. It is one of the contenders for the title of the largest town in England, and is the largest settlement in the home counties in terms of population. For ceremonial purposes it is in the Royal County of Berkshire and has served as the county town since 1867. It is also home to one of England's biggest music festivals.

Reading was an important national centre in the medieval period, as the site of an important monastery with strong royal connections, but suffered economic damage during the 17th century from which it took a long time to recover. Today it is again an important commercial centre, with strong links to information technology and insurance. It is also a university town, with two universities and a large student population.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA