Medical research

Sex, gender and the mechanisms of disease

Medical research did not always include women as participants or investigate the influence of sex and gender on health. This has now changed, and research is beginning to uncover ways in which sex as a biological variable ...

Obstetrics & gynaecology

Discovering a mysterious estrogen's important role in pregnancy

When a woman becomes pregnant, her levels of estriol, one of the three common estrogens that are nearly undetectable before conception, skyrocket. However, scientists never knew what this hormone does or why levels of it ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Diseased male livers undergo sex change

The livers of men diagnosed with hepatic diseases change sex as part of a potential self-protective mechanism, according to University of Queensland research.

Oncology & Cancer

Mutation leading to biological changes may play role in cancer

A new study from McGill University's Goodman Cancer Research Center (GCRC) has revealed significant biological changes in mice expressing an activated, mutant form of the Estrogen Receptor alpha (ER alpha), shedding new light ...

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Sex organ

A sex organ, or primary sexual characteristic, as narrowly defined, is any of the anatomical parts of the body which are involved in sexual reproduction and constitute the reproductive system in a complex organism; in mammals, these include:

The Latin term genitalia, sometimes anglicized as genitals and genital area, is used to describe the externally visible sex organs, known as primary genitalia or external genitalia: in males the penis, in females the clitoris and vulva.

The other, hidden sex organs are referred to as the secondary genitalia or internal genitalia. The most important of these are the gonads, a pair of sex organs, specifically the testes in the male or the ovaries in the female. Gonads are the true sex organs, generating reproductive gametes containing inheritable DNA. They also produce most of the primary hormones that affect sexual development, and regulate other sexual organs and sexually differentiated behaviors.

A more ambiguously defined term is erogenous zone, subjectively, any portion of the body that when stimulated produces erotic sensation, but always prominently including the genitalia.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA