Oncology & Cancer

Ancient viruses could help kill cancers

DNA "echoes" of viruses that infected our ancestors millions of years ago could help the immune system to identify and kill cancer cells, according to new research from Crick scientists.

HIV & AIDS

A cure for HIV? Feasible but not yet realized

This week a team of scientists and physicians from the U.K. published news of a second HIV positive man, in London, who is in long-term (18-month) HIV remission after undergoing treatment for Hodgkins lymphoma. The unexpected ...

HIV & AIDS

Innovative way to block HIV runs into a roadblock

Taking aim at a promising molecular target can combat the spread of retroviruses that can cause blood cancer and AIDS—but at the risk of leaving the host vulnerable to infections by other viral pathogens, a new Yale study ...

Medical research

No two kinds of retroviruses look—or act—the same

In the most comprehensive study of its kind, researchers in the Institute for Molecular Virology and School of Dentistry at the University of Minnesota report that most types of retroviruses have distinct, non-identical virus ...

Immunology

Ancient viral invaders in our DNA help fight today's infections

About eight percent of our DNA is viral in origin: remnants of ancient battles between infectious viruses and our ancestors. These so-called endogenous viruses are often perceived as a mere oddity with no clear biological ...

Medical research

New research could help improve HIV/AIDS therapies

Hideki Aihara, Zhiqi Yin, and Ke Shi of the University of Minnesota, along with colleagues from Cornell University and St. Louis University have made a major stride in exploring new therapies to combat HIV/AIDS and retrovirus-based ...

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