Neuroscience

The unexpected creates reward when listening to music

If you love it when a musician strikes that unexpected but perfect chord, you are not alone. New research shows the musically unexpected activates the reward centre of our brains, and makes us learn about the music as we ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Train the brain to form good habits through repetition

You can hack your brain to form good habits – like going to the gym and eating healthily – simply by repeating actions until they stick, according to new psychological research involving the University of Warwick.

Health

Bribe yourself to diet

(HealthDay)—For many people struggling with weight, an underlying reason for the excess pounds is the habit of using food to soothe bad feelings and reward good behavior. To lose weight, turn that habit on its ear.

Neuroscience

Brain scans predict stimulant drug relapse

Predicting who will remain drug-free and who will relapse following treatment for drug addiction has been impossible – so far. Now, Stanford psychologists think they've found a possible clue. For stimulants like cocaine ...

Neuroscience

Dopamine's yin-yang personality: It's an upper and a downer

For decades, psychologists have viewed the neurotransmitter dopamine as a double-edged sword: released in the brain as a reward to train us to seek out pleasurable experiences, but also a "drug" the constant pursuit of which ...

Neuroscience

How the brain hears and fears

How is it that a sound can send a chill down your spine? By observing individual brain cells of mice, scientists at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) are understanding how a sound can incite fear.

Neuroscience

Researchers discover clues to brain changes in depression

In new pre-clinical research, scientists at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM), led by Scott Thompson, Ph.D., Professor of Physiology, have identified changes in brain activity linked to the pleasure and ...

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