Psychology & Psychiatry

Parent-child play therapy relieves depression in preschoolers

(PhysOrg.com) -- A form of play therapy between parents and their toddlers can relieve depression in preschoolers, according to child psychiatry researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.

Psychology & Psychiatry

Sniff: women cry more than men, and for longer

It was already widely assumed, but German experts provided confirmation on Wednesday: women cry more often than men, for longer -- and in a more dramatic fashion.

Psychology & Psychiatry

Was Darwin wrong about emotions?

Contrary to what many psychological scientists think, people do not all have the same set of biologically "basic" emotions, and those emotions are not automatically expressed on the faces of those around us, according to ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Group finds facial expressions not as universal as thought

(Medical Xpress) -- For most of history, people have assumed that facial expressions are generally universal; a smile by someone of any cultural group generally is an expression of happiness or pleasure, for example. This ...

Neuroscience

Listening to music can change the way you judge facial emotions

A research project led by Dr Joydeep Bhattacharya at Goldsmiths, University of London has shown that it is possible to influence emotional evaluation of visual stimuli by listening to musical excerpts before the evaluation.

Psychology & Psychiatry

Misreading faces tied to child social anxiety

Children suffering from extreme social anxiety are trapped in a nightmare of misinterpreted facial expressions: They confuse angry faces with sad ones, a new Emory University study shows.

Psychology & Psychiatry

Research reveals pain and pleasure of sad music

Sad music can provide enjoyment, comfort or pain to different people, according to new research looking at the effects of melancholy songs on the emotions.

Psychology & Psychiatry

Sad music hits positive notes of emotional rewards

(Medical Xpress)—Sadness is discouraged; it's a mood to flee. We tell children not to look so sad. We tell adults to wipe that sad look off their face and smile. We worry that prolonged sadness needs medical attention. ...

page 1 from 6