Psychology & Psychiatry

Happiness and the evolution of brain size

During human evolution, the size of the brain increased, especially in a particular part called the neocortex. The neocortex enables us to speak, dream and think. In search of the causes underlying neocortex expansion, researchers ...

Neuroscience

Imagery reveals autism-related brain differences

People with autism spectrum disorder have lower levels of a protein that regulates the amount of serotonin in the brain, a paper from Karolinska Institutet in Sweden published in the journal Molecular Psychiatry reports. ...

Neuroscience

Guilt by dissociation: Study sheds light on serotonin in autism

Recent estimates indicate a prevalence of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in the United States of 1 in 59 children with a well-established 4:1 male predominance. Individual costs for care are estimated at about $2.4 million, ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Evaluating treatment for teen anxiety

Anxiety disorders are the most common mental illness in the U.S., with approximately 4.4 million children and adolescents affected, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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Serotonin

"Serotonin" redirects here. For the professional wrestling stable, see Serotonin.

Serotonin (pronounced /ˌsɛrəˈtoʊnən/) is a monoamine neurotransmitter. It is found extensively in the gastrointestinal tract of animals, and about 80 to 90 percent of the human body's total serotonin is located in the enterochromaffin cells in the gut, where it is used to regulate intestinal movements. The remainder is synthesized in serotonergic neurons in the central nervous system (CNS) where it has various functions, including control of appetite, mood and anger.

Serotonin is found not only in animals, but also in fungi and plants, including fruits and vegetables.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA