Psychology & Psychiatry

Serotonin transporters increase when depression fades, study shows

Low levels of serotonin in the brain are seen as a possible cause of depression and many antidepressants act by blocking a protein that transports serotonin away from the nerve cells. A brain imaging study at Karolinska Institutet ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Pumping the 'brain brake' in pediatric anxiety

As with any complex machine, sometimes a simple crossed wire or short circuit can cause problems with how it functions. The same goes for our brains, and even when the short circuit is uncovered, sometimes experts don't have ...

Neuroscience

The neural mechanism of a circulatory response to stress

Although the heart beats autonomously, its function can be regulated by the brain in response to, for instance, stressful events. In a new study, researchers from the University of Tsukuba discovered a novel mechanism by ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Why people with depression can sometimes experience memory problems

While we often associate depression with low mood, tiredness and feelings of hopelessness, less well known is that some people with depression may experience problems with their memory—such as feeling more forgetful than ...

page 1 from 40

Serotonin

"Serotonin" redirects here. For the professional wrestling stable, see Serotonin.

Serotonin (pronounced /ˌsɛrəˈtoʊnən/) is a monoamine neurotransmitter. It is found extensively in the gastrointestinal tract of animals, and about 80 to 90 percent of the human body's total serotonin is located in the enterochromaffin cells in the gut, where it is used to regulate intestinal movements. The remainder is synthesized in serotonergic neurons in the central nervous system (CNS) where it has various functions, including control of appetite, mood and anger.

Serotonin is found not only in animals, but also in fungi and plants, including fruits and vegetables.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA