Medical research

Size really does not matter when it comes to high blood pressure

Removing one of the tiniest organs in the body has shown to provide effective treatment for high blood pressure. The discovery, made by University of Bristol researchers and published in Nature Communications, could revolutionise ...

Oncology & Cancer

Discovery may help fight late-stage ovarian cancer

A potential breakthrough in treating late-stage ovarian cancer has come from University of Guelph researchers who have discovered a peptide that shrinks advanced tumours and improves survival rates for this deadly but often ...

Health

Carbon monoxide -- the silent calmer?

According to scientists, carbon monoxide (CO), a tasteless, colorless and odorless gas, is not only a danger to the environment but also highly toxic to human beings. Found in the exhaust of vehicles and generators, CO has ...

Cardiology

Mechanical basis for abdominal aortic embolism discovered

Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a complex and life-threatening vascular disease with high incidence worldwide. Termed the silent killer, most AAAs are asymptomatic, often going undetected until rupture, and involve a poorly ...

Medical research

Kidney failing? Grow a new one

Kidneys are not romanticised like the heart, or held on high like the brain. But these fist-sized organs are integral to our ability to filter waste and excess fluid from our bodies.

Oncology & Cancer

'Gonad groping' Brits won't spot testicle cancer - doctor

Celebrity appeals for British men to fondle their testicles to detect early signs of cancer are a waste of time and possibly harmful, an opinion piece published by the British Medical Journal (BMJ) says.

Health

Efforts to save lives in Nigeria with clean cookstoves

A UN-linked body launched a campaign in Nigeria on Tuesday aimed at preventing deaths due to toxic smoke from rudimentary cookstoves, one of the developing world's worst public health threats.

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Screen all baby boomers for hepatitis C, expert panel says

(HealthDay)—All adults born between 1945 and 1965—the baby boom generation—should be screened for the hepatitis C virus along with injection-drug users and anyone transfused before 1992, according to new recommendations ...

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