Psychology & Psychiatry

Older adults spot phoney smiles better, study shows

(PhysOrg.com) -- Your great aunt may be slowing down as she grows older, but a study created in a Brandeis laboratory reveals that she’s probably better than you are at perceiving a genuine smile.

Psychology & Psychiatry

Facial models suggest less may be more for a successful smile

Research using computer-animated 3D faces suggests that less is more for a successful smile, according to a study published June 28, 2017 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Nathaniel Helwig from the University of Minnesota, ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

How many types of smile are there?

In the mid 19th century, French neurologist Guillaume Duchenne wanted to distinguish real smiles from fake. Interested in the response of nerves and muscles to stimulation, he applied electricity to particular parts of faces ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Grin and bear it -- smiling facilitates stress recovery

Just grin and bear it! At some point, we have all probably heard or thought something like this when facing a tough situation. But is there any truth to this piece of advice? Feeling good usually makes us smile, but does ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Happy faces really are healthy faces

For thousands of years, we have been obsessed with having a healthy and attractive facial appearance – by any means necessary. The Egyptians crafted eyeliner from kohl, containing lead (definitely not good for you), and ...

Surgery

Surgeons transform static 'Mona Lisa' smiles to joyous ones

By modifying a muscle transplant operation, Johns Hopkins surgeons report they are able to restore authentic facial expressions of joy—wide and even smiles—to selected patients with one-sided facial muscle paralysis due ...

page 2 from 4