Neuroscience

Paralyzed mice with spinal cord injury made to walk again

Most people with spinal cord injury are paralyzed from the injury site down, even when the cord isn't completely severed. Why don't the spared portions of the spinal cord keep working? Researchers at Boston Children's Hospital ...

Medical research

First evidence that chitosan could repair spinal damage

Spinal injuries are some of the most debilitating that anyone can suffer. However, Richard Borgens and his team from the Center for Paralysis Research at the Purdue School of Veterinary Medicine can now offer spinal cord ...

Medical research

Stem cells restore mobility in neck-injured rats (w/ Video)

(PhysOrg.com) -- The first human embryonic stem cell treatment approved by the FDA for human testing has been shown to restore limb function in rats with neck spinal cord injuries - a finding that could expand the clinical ...

Medical research

Polymerized estrogen shown to protect nervous system cells

Spinal cord damage that causes paralysis and reduced mobility doesn't always stop with the initial trauma, but there are few treatment options to halt increased deterioration—and there is no cure. Researchers at Rensselaer ...

Medications

One step closer to chronic pain relief

Sortilin, which is a protein expressed on the surface of nerve cells, plays a crucial role in pain development in laboratory mice—and in all likelihood in humans as well. This is the main conclusion of the study "Sortilin ...

Neuroscience

Research sheds light on spinal cord injuries

Thousands of people worldwide suffer severe spinal cord injuries each year, but little is known about why these injuries often continue to deteriorate long after the initial damage occurs.

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