Medical research

Targeting stem cells that drive aggressive blood cancer

Peter Mac scientists have found a way to target acute myeloid leukemia (AML) at its source—a discovery that could yield a more effective treatment for this aggressive and often incurable blood cancer.

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Insights into psoriasis suggest a new treatment target

Psoriasis is a skin disorder that affects at least 100 million individuals worldwide. Its economic impact is more than $10 billion annually in the U.S. alone. Involved skin becomes thickened, red, and covered with silvery ...

Neuroscience

Team develops first of a kind in-vitro 3-D neural tissue model

Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have successfully used stem cells to engineer living biohybrid nerve tissue to develop 3-D models of neural networks with the hopes of gaining a better understanding ...

Oncology & Cancer

Microcapsules for targeted drug delivery to cancer cells

A team of scientists from Peter the Great St.Petersburg Polytechnic University (SPbPU) together with their colleagues developed a method of targeted drug delivery to cancer cells. The discovery is based on the use of mesenchymal ...

Genetics

2019: the year gene therapy came of age

In the summer, a mother in Nashville with a seemingly incurable genetic disorder finally found an end to her suffering—by editing her genome.

Medical research

WFIRM scientists push bioprinting capability forward

Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine (WFIRM) scientists are the first to report using bioprinting to print a tracheal tissue construct comprised of multiple different functional materials. They printed different ...

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Stem cell

Stem cells are cells found in most, if not all, multi-cellular organisms. They are characterized by the ability to renew themselves through mitotic cell division and differentiating into a diverse range of specialized cell types. Research in the stem cell field grew out of findings by Canadian scientists Ernest A. McCulloch and James E. Till in the 1960s. The two broad types of mammalian stem cells are: embryonic stem cells that are isolated from the inner cell mass of blastocysts, and adult stem cells that are found in adult tissues. In a developing embryo, stem cells can differentiate into all of the specialized embryonic tissues. In adult organisms, stem cells and progenitor cells act as a repair system for the body, replenishing specialized cells, but also maintain the normal turnover of regenerative organs, such as blood, skin or intestinal tissues.

Stem cells can now be grown and transformed into specialized cells with characteristics consistent with cells of various tissues such as muscles or nerves through cell culture. Highly plastic adult stem cells from a variety of sources, including umbilical cord blood and bone marrow, are routinely used in medical therapies. Embryonic cell lines and autologous embryonic stem cells generated through therapeutic cloning have also been proposed as promising candidates for future therapies.

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