Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Can surgical masks be reused?

Health authorities say the most widespread anti-COVID weapon—surgical masks—must be thrown away after a single use, but environmental concerns are pushing some scientists to question this recommendation.

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Virus tests support masks against COVID-19

Testing of commonly available fabric masks has found they significantly reduce the number of aerosolised viruses a wearer could be exposed to.

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Silk offers homemade solution for COVID-19 prevention

With personal protective equipment still in short supply, researchers at the University of Cincinnati examined what common household fabrics might work best as a face covering.

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Millions return to school in Italy after virus closure

Millions of Italian children returned to the classroom on Monday as most schools reopened more than six months after they were closed to curb the coronavirus pandemic.

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Surgical mask

A surgical mask is intended to be worn by health professionals during surgery and at other times to catch the bacteria shed in liquid droplets and aerosols from the wearer's mouth and nose.

Outside health care facilities, simple, inexpensive masks of similar appearance are commonly worn in heavily populated centres in East Asia to help prevent spreading the common cold. In Japan, it is common to wear a face mask while sick to avoid infecting others in public settings.

Surgical masks were widely used in China, Hong Kong, Vietnam, and Toronto, Canada during outbreaks of the SARS virus, during the 2007 avian bird flu pandemic in Japan, and more recently in the United States and Mexico City during the 2009 H1N1 flu outbreak, also known as the swine flu.

Modern surgical masks are made from paper or other non-woven material, and should be discarded after each use.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA