Psychology & Psychiatry

Swearing relieves both physical and social pain, study finds

Swearing has been shown to relieve physical pain when it comes to banging your toe or slamming a finger in a door. Now, a new psychology study shows we shouldn't be coy about cursing when suffering from an aching heart or ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Swearing aloud can make you stronger

In the research, Dr Stephens and his team conducted two experiments. In the first, 29 participants completed a test of anaerobic power—a short, intense period on an exercise bike—after both swearing and not swearing. ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Swearing correlated with higher language-related intelligence

The use of obscene or taboo language, or swearing as it's more commonly known, is often seen as a sign that the speaker lacks vocabulary, cannot express themselves in a less offensive way, or even lacks intelligence. Studies ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Swear words shed light on how language shapes thought

Why were people offended when BBC broadcaster James Naughtie mispronounced the surname of the Culture Secretary, Jeremy Hunt? Why is it much easier for bilingual speakers to swear in their second language? Why are people ...